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Home » Trucking Accidents » What Georgia laws govern slow-moving trucks and vehicles?

What Georgia laws govern slow-moving trucks and vehicles?

| Nov 17, 2017 | Trucking Accidents |

The state of Georgia is filled with rich and fertile farmland, which helps to boost the economy, provide income and feed the nation. While farming in the state is necessary and even welcome, many of the vehicles associated with agriculture often pose farming equipment and trucking accident risks.

Special equipment is needed to harvest and process Georgia crops and large trucks are necessary for transporting these crops. However, anyone who has come upon slow-moving vehicles on the state’s roadways knows that it could result in equipment collisions or trucking accidents.

The state’s lawmakers also understand the accident dangers. As such, there are laws in place to ensure that any use of slow-moving vehicles is as safe as possible. One way lawmakers address these dangers is by making it illegal for any vehicle to travel less than 25 mph without a special emblem. It is a misdemeanor to violate these laws.

Further, there exists a subset of law that mandates how the emblem looks and how it is to be used. For example, the emblem must be a special shape and size as defined by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers (ASAE). It must be placed as near as possible in the center of the rear end of the vehicle. Finally, it must be painted with a conspicuous red orange-colored retroreflective paint.

The legislature associated with slow-moving vehicles exists to enhance the safety of Georgia residents while enabling the agriculture industry to function and thrive. In the end, reducing the risk of farm equipment accidents and agricultural trucking accidents is in everyone’s best interests. If you need advice about an accident involving a slow-moving vehicle, an attorney can help.

Source: Georgia Governor’s Office of Highway Safety, “Slow-Moving Vehicles,” accessed Nov. 17, 2017